AwayGoalsRule Football Forum

The Internet's Finest Football Forum

Get moneyback specials on your football betting at PaddyPower


It is currently Thu Sep 21, 2017 5:10 pm

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Changing a HDD
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 3:09 pm 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 2:21 am
Posts: 7633
Now then boys and girls.

I have a techy question. Some of you may remember that PC I got a few years back through help from the our local forum nerds. Well..one of the internal drives has failed in the last few days(bad sectors or summat)...so i'll need to be swapping it for a new'un.

My complication is this, the computer/HDDs are set up as RAID 0. So I have two 500gb HDDs..set up with this RAID 0 thing so they're seen as 1tb by the computer. Makes it faster apparently..the Novatech people said.

So..what happens when I replace this drive? I understand this setup means that if 1 drives fails, both drives data is gone, no problem with that, as I had it all backed up. I just dont know what I need to do when replacing this dead drive. Will I literally just need to take one out and put the new one in and use my Vista recovery disc to reinstall windows on the drive? Will it still be setup as RAID 0? Does a Vista Recovery disc even let you install windows from scratch?

As ever, any help would be appreciated.

_________________
JSP wrote:
No longer do you have to settle for a fatty-boom-batty at the end of the night you can get yourself a reasonable looking sl*g.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Changing a HDD
PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2012 7:46 am 
Offline
General
General
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 17205
Location: Over there.
Highscores: 2
I've never actually used RAID, been meaning to get around to it but I always fill my drives up and then can't spare any capacity. :D

And RAID0 is indeed faster than two single drives the only drawback is that it halves your storage space as you know. But it actually increases the chances of data loss as only one drive has to fail to take your system down. RAID5 is my favourite, where you use three drives and get a speed boost plus added data security plus you only use 33% instead of 50% of your disk capacity for redundancy. If RAID5 fails, you just swap the broken drive for a new one and it simply rebuilds it, even better the array is usable in the meantime so your computer will still work. Costs an extra drive though is the only downside.

Anyhoo, the first thing to avoid is USB devices, don't have any plugged in or try to use an external USB drive it'll fail by design. Windows would not be able to determine the computer contains a valid system volume, but this only happens if you have any removable USB devices and flash cards plugged into the computer. So take 'em out if you have any plugged in.

From Windows Answers:
Quote:
"This is may also occur because the Windows Vista installation must be able to write to the boot volume of the computer, and the boot volume must be non-removable to prevent later removal of the boot device. If the boot device were removed, this would make it impossible for Windows Vista to start. A computer is restarted several times during installation. Because the BIOS reports the USB device as the boot device, and the USB device is removable, Windows Vista Installation cannot continue. This is by design.

I would suggest you to try the following steps:

Step 1: Unplug all the removable USB devices and flash cards from the computer, except for mouse and the keyboard.

Step 2: Change the BIOS settings so that the USB removable device has a lower priority than the internal hard disk drive and the DVD drive."



I assume you have hardware RAID on your motherboard? In which case it'll be setup in the BIOS and the chances are it's still set up as RAID0 from previously. And Windows Vista sees a RAID volume as one partition and should take care of the install just as if you were doing a normal install onto a single drive. Whether the recovery disk will do this I dunno, but it should do AFAIK... you'd have to check what to do with Novatech if it doesn't. I think that once the new same-capacity drive is in, the install should proceed as a normal Windows installation.

I found a guide for you (quoted below) but some of the steps may not apply, such as creating the RAID array in BIOS etc. but it does describe how to install the drivers via the 'Custom (advanced)' pre-install options near the start of the installation - if required - and it'll let you check if it's been detected as one drive/volume correctly. So you'd turn the PC on, open the disk tray, put the Windows disk in, close the tray then hit the reset button so that it reboots from the disk just like any other Windows install.

Quote:
You need to do the following:

1) create the RAID 0 array in the RAID BIOS.
2) Boot from your windows 7 disc
3) Choose your language and click NEXT
4) Click INSTALL NOW
5) Accept the agreement and click NEXT
6) Select Custom (advanced)
7) Click NEXT
8) Double check that the hard drive is roughly the right size (RAID 0 = STRIP so add the capacities of the two drives together for roughly 900+GB)
9) Click NEXT

If it accepts that and starts install then great - you don't need to do anything more than follow the prompts

If it says no drives can be found then Insert your motherboard driver disc and click LOAD DRIVER


10) Click Browse
11) Browse to the RAID driver folder on the disc and click OK
12) If it works then you're RAID drive should appear. Click Next to install as above.

The drives will format just after this stage and you won't have to do anything unless you want use separate partitions. You should only see 1 drive (volume) not two if you have created the RAID array properly. If you create the RAID and install windows you will not be able to move the drives to another (different) motherboard unless you break the array and reformat the drives. The only exception to this is if the other board is the same make and has the same RAID controller on it. Creating the RAID set does not format the drive - it merely links them together so that they can then be formatted as a single volume.

Source: Novatech forum


If it all goes wrong, Novatech tech support is here.
Click The Link...http://www.novatech.co.uk/contact.html

_________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking.

Image
Image


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Changing a HDD
PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2012 10:14 am 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 2:21 am
Posts: 7633
Cheers con, I'll have a proper read when I'm out of work. Haven't even bought the drive yet like, terrified of getting ripped off :p Seems they're all roughly the same price regardless of where you buy 'em anyway though so I'll probably order it today.


Why is RAID0 faster btw? I understand it splits data across the two drives..but to my brain the pc having to look in two different locations for data should take longer.

[ Post made via Android ] Image

_________________
JSP wrote:
No longer do you have to settle for a fatty-boom-batty at the end of the night you can get yourself a reasonable looking sl*g.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Changing a HDD
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 12:02 am 
Offline
Major
Major
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 2949
conscience wrote:
And RAID0 is indeed faster than two single drives the only drawback is that it halves your storage space as you know.

Thats RAID1 that halves your storage Con not RAID0 if he has two 500gb HDDs then he will have 1tb of total storage. The only time he would lose out on any storage would be if he has two HDDs of different sizes. The difference in size between the two would be what he would lose in total. Example a 300gb and a 500gb in Raid0 and you would finish up with 600gb after losing 200gb... a 250gb and a 400gb in Raid0 you would finish up with 500gb after losing 150gb and so on.

_________________
Isn't hip and cool


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Changing a HDD
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 12:28 am 
Offline
General
General
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 17205
Location: Over there.
Highscores: 2
Yeah I know, seems I got it the wrong way around, probs a typo. :p And you're right. :geek: RAID0 isn't true RAID anyway, as there's no redundancy. Maybe that's why it got a zero in it's name?

And Boro - the 'trick' to the speed increase with RAID comes from each drive having a separate disk controller chip that is responsible for all disk read/write operations initiated by the computer, so if you have more than one you can perform simultaneous reads and writes - which is much faster than waiting for one disk operation to finish before starting the next. The reason is that the PC's speed is lightening compared to the slow drives, so often your PC is waiting on your HDD anyway, but obviously less so with two (or more) operations at once.

There's more here if anyone is interested.

_________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking.

Image
Image


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron