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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 11:56 am 
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Kevin Prince Boateng is apparently having a medical at Schalke ahead of a proposed transfer from Milan.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 12:33 pm 
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Celtic and Barcelona to go through in griup H :p

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pakrooney wrote:

So true mate ...he is consistently inconsistent throughout his united career ..but what if he turns consistent ..he will get around 40 goals...ATM im waiting for that time as his age is 24/25 :wait: ... :|
on Rooney ,Jan 16th, ..and as they rest is history


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 12:34 pm 
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Celtic and Barcelona to go through in griup H :p

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pakrooney wrote:

So true mate ...he is consistently inconsistent throughout his united career ..but what if he turns consistent ..he will get around 40 goals...ATM im waiting for that time as his age is 24/25 :wait: ... :|
on Rooney ,Jan 16th, ..and as they rest is history


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:31 pm 
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The game was up before transfer deadline day™ began in earnest in Germany: you know it's going to be the dampest of pretzels when the most exciting name on the DFL transfer list is Niko Kranjcar. The Croat's mysterious inclusion at lunchtime threw up the delicious possibility that Hamburger SV were maybe considering the installation of Harry Redknapp (with Felix Magath as director of football) but that nano-excitement waned a few hours later, when the realisation dawned that "top, top player" Kranjcar was of course Queens Park Rangers-bound, set to be signed for a third time by Harry. A t'riffic bit of business, no doubt.

In previous years, the shutting of the window has been so similarly nondescript that the whole phenomenon is yet to acquire its own proper German name, let alone a sense of occasion and tradition. But that is not to say that transfer deadline day™ doesn't have an impact. In fact, its popularity has been rising steadily, albeit for largely secret, largely unmentioned reasons that are quite different to those in the UK. It's chief and not-to-be-underestimated function in Germany is not unlike those played by Asterix comics, Benny Hill reruns and encounters with Her Majesty's subjects on the lash in a southern European tourist hellhole: reassuring confirmation that the English are (still) full-on, wrong-side-of-the-road-two-taps-on-the-sink bonkers.

The Bundesliga watched open-mouthed, with morbid fascination as leading clubs in the leading league of the world changed targets almost daily, pursued speculative bids that had little to no chance of succeeding and then embarked on their customary "last orders" scramble on Monday. The scenes after the final bell were pretty similar to those encountered by any frequenter of UK high streets after 11pm on a Saturday: a jumble of broken dreams, low-level crime – mostly muggings – and approximately 3.57 desperate, doomed hook-ups for every happily snogging, well-suited couple.

Now the (immensely self-satisfying) question going through every sensible, measured German's mind is just why the English love leaving it so late? Is it a basic misunderstanding of football business dynamics, the patently irrational hope that the best deals will be available shortly before the window slams shut? Macho-posturing has been mentioned in this context, but maybe a slavish adherence to the rules of engagement or the rather un-macho fear of being seen to break the rules are better explanations. No such procedural hang-ups exist in Spain, Italy or indeed good old Deutschland, where key transfers are often done by springtime, in blatant but also blatantly tolerated violation of the respective league's transfer regulations. Why waste time keeping up appearances when everybody's aware about the real game being played?

It's telling that recent calls for the transfer window to close before the Premier League restarts have found little to no echo overseas. Only the English seem to distrust their own passion for last-minute excess so much that they want to restrict themselves to an even tighter schedule. Two weeks' less speculation might make life easier for one or two managers but all it would do in the majority of cases is bring the binge-bidding forward. Imagine pubs kicking out punters an hour earlier. Will they drink less as a consequence?

In the more sober (and of course incredibly smug) confines of the Bundesliga, by contrast, the last few days demonstrated how the transfer period could be used to its fullest in its existing shape. Matchday four was dominated by two very different arrivals at two very different clubs who had come at very different times – but who have both made an instant impact.

Specimen A: Henrikh Mkhitaryan. The Armenian scored two goals in Borussia Dortmund's 2-1 win at Eintracht Frankfurt – the second one was a real beauty – and once again underlined the intelligent transfer dealings of the Jürgen Klopp-coached team. Despite some considerable pressure from their fans, who wanted an instant replacement for Mario Götze, and the manager, who insisted that new recruits should be in place by the time training started again at the beginning of July, the club calmly looked at half a dozen options before deciding on the elegant No10 from Shakhtar Donetsk. There were murky third- and fourth-party ownership issues as well as sizable competition but Dortmund got the deal done with minimal fuss over the course of 48 hours, for €25m-€27.5m, on 9 July. Signing the 24-year-old this early was crucial to Klopp's plans – the manager knows that new arrivals often take a few weeks to get used to his side's collective gameplan. Dortmund also couldn't afford to wait for various domino effects to kick in – they understood that the chance to get him was dependent on moving quickly.

Dortmund also made sure that Mkhitaryan would be schooled in Borussian ways by Mr Black and Yellow himself, Kevin Grosskreutz. Sharing rooms with the club's unofficial spokesman was probably the ultimate test of Mkhitaryan's adaptability. He passed with flying colours, by all accounts; even Grosskreutz's insistence on teaching him 20 classic clubs songs didn't make him doubt his decision to move to the Westfalenstadion. He knew he wanted to play for Dortmund ever since coming up against them with Shakhtar in spring, the player told with a broad smile, "they played so well that I thought: I want to play with them." Beats the usual "childhood dream" rhetoric, doesn't it? Klopp couldn't be happier, naturally. "He's even a bit nicer as a human being than as a player," said the manager, "that makes [working with him] very agreeable".

Will Jens Keller soon roll out similar compliments for Kevin-Prince Boateng, our specimen B? Maybe not. But then again, the Ghanian international wasn't signed for being a nice man, rather the opposite. Schalke had started the season poorly. They have quite a few injured players and were engulfed by a strange fog of lethargy. Worst of all, there was – and still is – a niggling sense that the manager, Keller, is too short of charisma and leadership qualities to power on a club that aims for the stars but often quickly resigns itself to its own, trophyless fate. Following on from the fairly embarrassing showing against Paok in the Champions League qualifier – the Royal Blues only squeezed through thanks to the inspired Julian Draxler – the sporting directorm, Horst Heldt, pressed the emergency button with the skull and bones logo. Boateng was flown into Gelsenkirchen on Friday morning and soon signed for a bargain €12m from Milan.

The 26-year-old was put straight into the side for the tricky home tie against Bayer Leverkusen, and the positive effect was immense. "It's as if the whole club has been changed," wrote Süddeutsche. Boateng's "bad boy" presence had indeed altered the equation completely. All of a sudden, S04 played with courage and verve, Leverkusen were swept aside. "Schalke needed power, dynamism, confidence and authority; a figure who scares the opposition," wrote WAZ. "All these things are delivered by Boateng." "We now have a real gangster gang," joked Felipe Santana, with reference to Boateng and the other tattoo-loving newcomer, Dennis Aogo (HSV).

It's hard to tell whether that love-in will survive his first red card or the next, inevitable managerial crisis at Schalke. But for the moment, getting Boateng in has at least allayed fears of a total meltdown over the coming weeks. His case wonderfully illustrates the importance of having the freedom to act in the transfer market after the season has started. Schalke got a perfectly good deal, to boot, even if they had to compromise a little when it came to Boateng's inner values. "Dortmund are my favourite club, I watch all of their games," the midfielder had told spox.com only a few weeks ago.

Results: Freiburg 1-1 Bayern, Gladbach 4-1 Bremen, Wolfsburg 2-0 Hertha, Nürnberg 0-1 Augsburg, Hamburger SV 4-0 Braunschweig, Schalke 2-0 Leverkusen, Hannover 4-1 Mainz, Stuttgart 6-2 Hoffenheim, Frankfurt 1-2 Dortmund.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 7:30 pm 
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Fifteen minutes into Bayern Munich's toughest Bundesliga match of the season thus far, a good number of fears about Pep Guardiola's new regime were being realised. The visitors looked blunt in attack, muddled in midfield and vulnerable at the back. Schalke, aware that the high but narrow position of Bayern's full-backs Rafinha and David Alaba left them space to attack down the flanks, were having the better of the champions in the Veltins-Arena. In the centre, Philipp Lahm was more Javi (García) than Xavi – sloppy on the ball, dispossessed by Kevin-Prince Boateng, who forced a save from Manuel Neuer.

Schalke's manager, Jens Keller, was sensing that this could be his day. The Royal Blues had lost their last five league games against the Bavarians, yet here they were, on their way to a tactically well-engineered win that would put them on the map as title contenders and deliver Keller, the Pep-Slayer™, a truckload of credibility.

But then it was all over. A corner from Arjen Robben found the unmarked Bastian Schweinsteiger in the box – his marker, Boateng, had been blocked off the ball – and Atsuto Uchida, defending on the line for Schalke, could not keep out the header. A minute later, Alaba crossed to Mario Mandzukic, who made it 2-0 with another downward header. That double hit did not just decide the result, it delineated precisely where Schalke's match ended and Bayern's started. Those promising early moments and the unwavering support from the crowd provided the only solace for the home team after a 4-0 defeat that Keller called a "drubbing", Schalke's heaviest at home in 32 years.

For Guardiola on the other hand, it was much more than the biggest win of his reign. "It was our best game," said the Catalan. "I don't know if it was a small or a little step but it was a step forward." It felt more like a giant leap. Schalke just zombied through the second half, transfixed by Bayern's stupendous confidence in possession. Guardiola denied it later ("There is no perfect game") but his side were very much flirting with perfection in minutes 20 to 90.

They were scarily dominant, in complete control of space, time, the ball and their opponents. Like Spain and Barcelona at their very best, Bayern did not even afford Schalke the opportunity to foul them – they were always three steps ahead and appeared to be playing with four extra men in midfield. A four-goal margin (with Franck Ribéry and Claudio Pizarro also scoring) did not begin to do justice to a gulf in class so wide it threatened to devour the entire city of Gelsenkirchen.

"You are 2-0 down and don't stop running after the ball like an idiot, that's demotivating," sighed the Schalke left-back Dennis Aogo. "We didn't lose against any team today but against the best team in the world," said Boateng. That verdict was self-serving, of course, but it did not feel too far off the mark.

Bayern's supreme performance brought to mind 11 Freunde's "Breaking Pep" August issue cover that had cast the Bayern coach as football's Walter White: after much tinkering in the (training) lab, a winning formula is beginning to produce rather intoxicating stuff. The two main ingredients – order and flexibility – are mundane enough but it is all in the mixture ratio. In possession, Bayern line up in four lines, with two centre-backs, the full-backs pushed up alongside the deep-lying midfielder, four attacking midfielders and a striker. The three central midfielders constantly switch positions and the wide players are encouraged to move inside to create a funnel of pressure in the middle. Bayern pass the ball more than ever before but as Süddeutsche Zeitung noted, the passes are being made in more congested space. Losing the ball high up the pitch is almost a part of the system, wrote the paper, since it allows Bayern to press high up and win the ball back in the most dangerous positions.

Saturday showed that the players have begun to buy into this change, after some initial resistance. Bigger tests against better opposition will be needed before one can be sure that it works against the best sides in Europe (and Borussia Dortmund) but you can sense that the team is finding its feet under Guardiola's new system. Crucially, the manager has also adapted his tactics to the realities on the ground. "I have learned that the most important thing is to control the counter-attacks because every loss of possession is a counter-attack in the Bundesliga," he explained. Such is the importance of the counter that he has taken to calling Germany "Konterland".

Depending on the exact position of the ball, his Bayern team alternate between counter-pressing and closing down spaces in midfield. Both take plenty of practice as well as intelligence from the players. The game against Schalke felt so remarkable because it suggested, for the first time, that Guardiola and his team could evolve into something very special – not diminish each other, as the fear had been a few weeks earlier.

The extent of the progress – and its pace – has been frightening.

Talking points
• Werder striker Nils Petersen was the king of the North (derby) with the two goals away to Hamburger SV that plunged the home side deeper into crisis on Saturday. "From now on, we're only fighting against relegation and for our existence," said captain Heiko Westermann. Bert van Marwijk is expected to sign up as the new manager on Tuesday – an eminently sensible appointment in these precarious circumstances, even if the Dutchman is perhaps not the man to take them dramatically forward in the next couple of years. If you're looking for this column's usual, lazy, sarcastic digs at a proud club's expense, incidentally, look elsewhere: they are sadly beyond a joke right now.

• It wasn't a good weekend for those in Yellow. Angela Merkel's coalition partner, the FDP, were booted out of the Bundestag on Sunday. But that's another story. Dortmund at least escaped with a 1-1 draw after struggling at Nürnberg the day before. A rare Marcel Schmelzer free-kick saw them take the lead, Per Nilsson equalised. Both sides had plenty of chances to win the match but Jürgen Klopp, who fielded youngster Marvin Ducksch in attack and Erik Durm in defence, took a sanguine view. "We can live with the point, we've lost games here in the past," he said.

• "Help! We don't understand the rules anymore," screamed a BILD piece under the headline "Hand-Chaos". The paper is not alone, it seems; a number of players and coaches have admitted to being unclear about the laws of the game in relation to handling the ball, too. "I don't know anymore," said Leverkusen coach Sami Hyypiä. A flood of penalties – there have been eight this season, compared with two at this stage in 2012/13 – have followed in the wake of the confusion. The situation has become so bad that Robin Dutt feels a rule-change is in order. "There should be an automatic penalty if someone touches the ball with their arm in the box (or has the ball kicked against it)," said the Werder coach. Klaus Hoeltzenbein of the Süddeutschen Zeitung conversely argued for more discretion: why not give the referee the option to award an indirect free-kick when there's no intent?

Results: Borussia Mönchengladbach 4-1 Eintracht Braunschweig, Hamburg 0-2 Werder Bremen, Schalke 0-4 Bayern Munich, Nürnberg 1-1 Dortmund, Mainz 1-4 Bayer Leverkusen, Wolfsburg 2-1 Hoffenheim, Hanover 2-1 Augsburg, Freiburg 1-1 Hertha Berlin, Stuttgart 1-1 Eintracht Frankfurt.



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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 2:42 pm 
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Hoffenheim's call for their Bundesliga game against Bayer Leverkusen to be replayed after the awarding of an incorrect goal has been rejected.

Leverkusen striker Stefan Kiessling headed the ball through a hole in the side of Hoffenheim's net in his team's 2-1 away win earlier this month.

Referee Felix Brych did not spot that Kiessling's effort missed the target.

But, despite Hoffenheim's protest, the German Football Association (DFB) insists the result will stand.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2013 8:39 pm 
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Dortmund 0-3 Bayern

Gotze who else with the first and late goals by Robben & Muller made the score line way more flattering than it was.

Dortmund missing a lot of first team players entire first choice back 4 out plus Gundogen meant they were up against it from the start but there really wasn't much between the sides. They ended up being done on counters chasing the game.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:26 pm 
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Two club teams that can hold their own against the best in Europe, full stadiums, a renaissance for the Bundesliga brand abroad and a Nationalmannschaft that will go into next year's World Cup as one of the favourites: 2013 has been the best year for German football since Sky invented the game in the early 90s. But all this positivity isn't to the taste of everybody. It was only a matter of time before the Bedenkenträger crew – a group of professional doubters who excel at reading the writing on the wall – started worrying again. They serve up good old Angst, albeit with a twist: after a decade of bemoaning the Bundesliga's poor showings in Europe, the complaint is now that a couple of clubs have become too good.
Felix Magath fired the opening salvo in an interview with Hamburger Morgenpost 10 days ago in which he suggested Germany's top two clubs should play in a European super league. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund were so dominant that "they would have to be excluded from the national competition," he said. "A Europa-Liga would be more honest." First spot in the Bundesliga was "pre-awarded to Bayern", added the 60-year-old, and he worried that "clubs that continuously play in the Champions League have huge advantages". The former Bayern Munich keeper Oliver Kahn took up that baton and ran a bit further. While he acknowledged that there was no objective indication that the hegemony of Bayern and Dortmund was hurting the Bundesliga, he felt that Sepp Herberger's old mantra ("people go to the stadium because they don't know how the match will end") might not ring as true when Pep Guardiola's team go through 39 games without defeat. "In view of that and in recognition of the increasing convergence of Europe, it would be a logical consequence to introduce a Europa-Liga with 34 match days, on which the best 18 teams in Europe would meet," Kahn wrote in Bild.
Banning teams for being too good would be a novel idea. A Bundesliga without the big two would certainly be incredibly competitive and open up the title race to the likes of Gladbach, Hertha BSC, Schalke, while Leverkusen would probably finish second. But at what cost? "The Bundesliga would be the second division, they can't want that," said Karl-Heinz Rummenigge. As the head of the European Club Association, he was firmly against the idea, despite some pressure from foreign colleagues, he added. The Dortmund CEO Hans-Joachim Watzke told ZDF Sportstudio on Saturday night that he "despaired about the nonsense that is being suggested". Even if Bayern and Dortmund were allowed to play both domestically and in a new super league, matches in the former would be automatically diminished. "The reserves would play there," he said. "We don't want to destroy our football culture".
Thankfully, Magath's and Kahn's harebrained ideas seem to have little backing. Most people understand that a lack of money cannot be helped by killing off your two golden geese or sending them into European exile. But there's an alternative, less radical proposal. The Eintracht Frankfurt boss Heribert Bruchhagen wants a more equitable distribution of the Champions League money. "The spread has become too big. In Europe, the championships are exclusively contested by those who regularly play in the Champions League," he said in an interview with Sportstudio. By way of explanation, he mentioned that Bayern's wage bill was about 50% higher than Hamburg's in 1992 but was now "400% higher" than that of the (sleeping) northern giants.
Bruchhagen has a point. The millions from Uefa do create an imbalance. The Bundesliga distributes domestic TV income by roughly employing a "factor 2" formula. The top team earn €33m (£27.3m), approximately double that of the last one, who earn €16m (£13.3m). Those relatively modest sums are put into the shade by the €65m and €54m Bayern and Dortmund respectively earned from doing well in Europe last season.
Watzke, however, thinks Bruchhagen's analysis is too simplistic. "If he was right, it would have been impossible for us to win the championship in 2011 after not competing in the Champions League for nine years," he said. "Frankfurt were relegated two years ago, now they're in the Europa League. That shows that there is permeability [at the top of the league]."
Watzke added that he wasn't averse to the debate but argued that the "weak don't get strong by making the strong weaker". He argued that making Bayern and Dortmund less competitive by reducing their revenues would make them less competitive internationally and do more harm than good. Everyone benefitted from strong showings in Europe, he explained, due to the increase of the value of foreign TV rights. A perceived lack of domestic competitiveness has certainly not harmed the "product": the German Football League are on course to double international income from €70m to €150m-per-year after 2015. These numbers provide an interesting lesson. Globally, there's more interest in seeing two very strong teams than a more balanced league without sides that can realistically challenge in Europe. In other words, the appeal of a league is largely determined by the excellence of its elite.
This is a particularly strong argument in light of the restricted opportunities for growth domestically. The value of live rights continues to be depressed by the competition commission's ruling that highlights should be freely available and by there being no credible pay TV alternative to Sky Germany. (This season, the 36 teams in the top two divisions will make €560m, that figure will rise to €673m by 2016/17.)
The biggest argument in favour of the status quo is Dortmund's comeback though. They seemed to have blown their chance by squandering €150m from their IPO on players and teetered on the brink of bankruptcy eight years ago. In their absence, other teams won titles – Stuttgart, Wolfsburg – but other heavyweights like Schalke and Werder Bremen regressed while gross underachievement continued at clubs like Frankfurt, Hamburg, Hertha and Köln who should all benefit from a competitive advantage (size and wealth of city) in relation to the Black and Yellows but don't. Instead of dreaming up new ways to cut the top two down in size, Bruchhagen and his ilk would be better served analysing what Dortmund and Bayern have done right in recent years. Hiring the right managers would be a start.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:34 pm 
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Matchday 28 is best contemplated with Sir Joe Quartermain playing on loop in the background. Granted, there was the odd positive story – Schalke won, Marco Reus scored a hat-trick, Gladbach bought André Hahn (Augsburg) for €2,25m – and even a hilarious, perfect if slightly early April fool's joke: US national team manager Jürgen Klinsmann named Berti Vogts as his "Special Advisor," Sport Bild wrote. Walter M Straten from sister publication Bild then upped the LOL ante, asking "Are we in danger now?"

Germany play the US at the World Cup, you see. Incredibly, the whole world seems to have fallen for this hoax. Brilliant. Just utterly brilliant. (Hold on. Really? Are you serious? Hmm) By and large though, the negativity in this league was quite unreal.

Bayer Leverkusen? In trouble. A 1-1 draw at home to bottom team Eintracht Braunschweig puts Champions League qualification for next season in acute doubt. But the situation is much worse than fourth spot in the table suggests: confidence in Sami Hyypïa, the monosyllabic Finn, is eroding so fast that Michael Schade came out with the sort of super-terse public backing you'd rather not hear as a manager. "We want to finish the season with Sami, nothing has changed," said the club's CEO. As ever, the problem is also one of perception, not just of results. Hyypïa is so cool and relaxed that he's made absolutely zero effort to hide the fact that his team's anaemic performances are just as puzzling to him as to everyone else.

Maybe a crafty "We know exactly what the problems are and we're working on it" – or, alternatively, "I have an iPad!" – might have helped matters. And as if Leverkusen's performance didn't stink enough on Saturday, centre-back Emir Spahic is also in trouble with the authorities for showing Braunschweig keeper Daniel Davari the "stinkefinger" (Latin: Digitus medius) during the game.

Nürnberg? Also in trouble. They just came short in a five-goal six-pointer away to SC Freiburg and are still very much in the danger zone, like Kenny Loggins. This was at its best, the most compelling basement scrap you're likely to see this season, the Selfridges summer sale notwithstanding. Both sides attacked relentlessly and created plenty of chances at the Mage Solar stadium; in the end, the home side edged the thrilling contest. The game was utterly brilliant and would have deserved a lot more column inches but sadly, some choice words stole the headlines.

Firstly, Sky Deutschland pundit Lothar Matthäus declared that Nürnberg forward Josip Drmic – who was once again on the scoresheet to make it 16 goals this season –was on his way to Arsenal. "His wife is looking for a home there," said the former international. This was news to the Swiss striker. "I'm solo," he clarified before adding that there was no deal in place. "But it's everybody's dream to play for Arsenal," he added. Matthäus, however, stuck to his version of events – kind of. "I know the woman in question and she is indeed looking for a place for him in London," he told Bild on Monday.

VfB Stuttgart? In even more trouble. The Swabians played as well as they have in many weeks against Borussia Dortmund and were 2-0 up inside 20 minutes, thanks to goals from Christian Gentner and Martin Harnik. "You feel like puking," said BVB defender Mats Hummels later. But in one of the many sickening twists of this season for the home side, Marco Reus struck back with a hat-trick. Stuttgart are still in 16th spot in the wake of this horrific defeat and there's still no way to gauge whether new manager Huub Stevens has brought a modicum of stability or even more chaos with his tactical changes and reshuffling at the back. The numbers aren't good, in any case. VfB have lost 10 out of the last 13 Bundesliga matches.

Hamburger SV? In the worst trouble of all. Mirko Slomka's side played pretty well in the first half at Borussia Mönchengladbach and were 1-0 up (Jacques Zoua) but then a handball from Michael Mancienne turned the tide. Filip Daems converted the penalty (on the rebound) and the Foals soon pulled away to turn out 3-1 winners.

"There's tremendous disappointment in the dressing room," said Slomka, "we have lost a game that was on a knife-edge for 75 minutes". It's true that the visitors' were decent enough throughout but the pressure to avoid a first-ever, ignominious relegation will be incredibly hard to handle in the next six games. One particular gimmick didn't help – the HSV officials were wearing special floral badges in the club's colours - and off the pitch, some supporters things weren't quite rosy either. Between 50 and 70 HSV supporters broke through a stadium gate to invade the away end, slightly injured six stewards and threw a few smoke bombs. HSV can ill-afford the hefty fine that's bound to follow.

Results:
Schalke 2-0 Hertha, Leverkusen 1-1 Braunschweig, Schalke 2-0 Hertha, Freiburg 3-2 Nürnberg, FC Bayern 3-3 Hoffenheim, Stuttgart 2-3 Dortmund, Wolfsburg 2-1 Frankfurt, Mainz 3-0 Augsburg, Gladbach 3-1 Hamburger SV, Hannover 1-2 Bremen.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 8:54 am 
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Borussia Dortmund must keep hold of boss Jurgen Klopp if they are to challenge Bayern Munich, says Tottenham assistant coach Steffen Freund.

Dortmund are 20 points adrift of the Bundesliga champions, who also won last season's title by a huge margin.

But ex-Dortmund star Freund, 44, does not think closing the gap is out of the question - if they hang on to Klopp.

"With him the team grew into the best team in Germany. I think he can do the same again," he told BBC World Service.

Klopp, 46, has been continually linked with a move away from Dortmund, including to English sides Arsenal and Manchester United, despite signing a new two-year contract in October.

The ex-Mainz manager has transformed the fortunes of the eight-time German champions since replacing Thomas Doll in 2008.

Dortmund finished in the bottom half of the Bundesliga under Doll, before Klopp led them to successive top-six finishes and then back-to-back German titles in 2011 and 2012.

But they have struggled to keep pace with Bayern on the domestic stage in the past two seasons, with the Bavarians winning consecutive titles in record time.

Last month, Pep Guardiola's team were crowned German champions for a 24th time with seven matches to spare - beating last season's triumph by a game.

"Jurgen Klopp is the most important person at Borussia Dortmund," added Freund, who played for Dortmund between 1993 and 1998.

Play mediaChampions League final: Dortmund boss Jurgen Klopp's philosophy
"They had been involved in the relegation zone, or in mid-table, until he arrived.

"I think he can do the same again with young players like striker Marvin Ducksch and left-back Erik Durm. They have options and good players coming through."

But Dortmund's recent failure has been compounded by their two brightest stars agreeing to join Bayern in the past 12 months.

Germany attacking midfielder Mario Gotze, 21, moved to the Allianz Arena for a Bundesliga record fee of £31.5m last year, while Poland striker Robert Lewandowski, 25, will make the same move when his contract expires this summer.

And ex-Germany international Freund warns the Bavarians' cherry picking of their rivals' talent will continue.

"Bayern are the strongest team - financially too - and everyone knows that," added Freund. "So that's why Gotze and Lewandowski have gone - and this will happen again."


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2014 11:47 am 
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German midfielder Julian Draxler has reiterated his desire to stay at Schalke this summer.

The 20-year-old has been a target for Arsenal over the past 12 months and they showed an interest both last summer and in January.

But with four years left on his current deal he is showing no signs of wanting to leave Schalke - with any club wanting him already knowing his release clause which stands at €45.5million.

Speaking to Bild, he said: "Of course, I am expecting some unverified rumours coming up throughout this summer. But it is very, very likely I will play for Schalke next season.

"I am able to seriously confirm I do not have any thoughts on leaving the club this summer!"

Draxler, who is going to the World Cup with Germany, helped Schalke secure third spot in the Bundesliga at the weekend with a 4-1 win over Nurnberg earning them a place in the group stage of the Champions League next season.

A product of the club's youth system, he became the youngest Schalke player to make 100 Bundesliga appearances recently while he has already been capped 10 times by his country.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 11:30 pm 
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Bayern Munich began their German season with defeat as Borussia Dortmund easily won the Supercup with a 2-0 victory.

Bayern won the Bundesliga by 19 points last season and also beat Dortmund in the German Cup final.

But - despite handing striker Robert Lewandowski a debut against the club he left in the summer - Pep Guardiola's side were out of sorts.

Henrikh Mkhitaryan drove Dortmund ahead before Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang sealed the win with a fine header.

Dortmund's fans inside a full Westfalenstadion will enjoy the win but should also remember that Jurgen Klopp's side defeated Bayern 4-2 in last season's Supercup - before Bayern dominated the domestic season.

Both sides were far from full strength, with many of their German World Cup winners only recently back in training after being given extended breaks.

Dortmund started with just four of the side which were beaten by Bayern in May's German Cup final, while Pep Guardiola had five of that side in his XI.

Arjen Robben and Franck Ribery - who has announced his retirement from international duty with France - were both missing for Bayern, while midfielder Toni Kroos has joined Real Madrid this summer.

Bayern began the game playing with three at the back but their plans were affected when Spain defender Javi Martinez had to leave the field on a stretcher after an innocuous looking challenge,

By that point Mkhitaryan had put the home side ahead with a thunderous drive from 10 yards as Lewandowski toiled up front for Bayern.

The Polish striker scored 74 league goals in four years for Dortmund before moving to Bayern on a free transfer but offered little in a rusty-looking Bayern side and was booed off.

Germany goalkeeper Manuel Neuer kept Bayern in it with a string of saves before Aubameyang sealed the win with a thumping header and produced a Spiderman mask from his sock in celebration.

The Bundesliga season starts on Friday 22 August.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 1:35 pm 
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Wolfsburg have confirmed the signing of Denmark striker Nicklas Bendtner, who was released by Arsenal this summer.

The 26-year-old joins the Bundlesliga club on a three-year deal after spending nine years with the Gunners, in which he scored 45 goals in 171 appearances.

It was a spell which also included loans at Birmingham, Sunderland and Juventus.

"We want to play a good role in all three competitions this season, and to do this we need players who already know what this kind of challenge is all about," Wolves manager Dieter Hecking said.

"Nicklas embodies precisely the kind of striker we were looking for. He fits the profile and is going to strengthen our squad."

Wolfsburg managing director Klaus Allofs described Bendtner as “a striker at the best age, who already was able to gather a lot of international experience in his career, which did not always run in a straight line."

Bendtner has been given squad number three at Wolfsburg, the 2009 Bundesliga champions who finished fifth last season.


Gutted Wolfsburg


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 10:59 am 
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Surely hould have been sent off ..

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pakrooney wrote:

So true mate ...he is consistently inconsistent throughout his united career ..but what if he turns consistent ..he will get around 40 goals...ATM im waiting for that time as his age is 24/25 :wait: ... :|
on Rooney ,Jan 16th, ..and as they rest is history


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 2:26 pm 
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Not 100% sure on the rules but I believe for it to be a red card for handball I believe it has to be a) denying a goal (basically blocking a shot with your hands) or b) deliberate handball that denies a clear goal scoring opportunity.

This one is obviously closer to b but for me the player is so far away from goal that the ref can probably justify a yellow card.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 3:24 pm 
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Stupid decision IMO it deosnt make sense ..should be a red for me .. he is clearly denying him a goal opportunity ..

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pakrooney wrote:

So true mate ...he is consistently inconsistent throughout his united career ..but what if he turns consistent ..he will get around 40 goals...ATM im waiting for that time as his age is 24/25 :wait: ... :|
on Rooney ,Jan 16th, ..and as they rest is history


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 3:31 pm 
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He's a lucky boy no doubt but the fact that he's going down the wing and it happens so far up the pitch with defenders also chasing back towards goal has probably saved him there as refs will try to avoid giving a straight red card wherever possible in matches.

I know the keeper is out of the goal but he's still 30-40 yards from goal on the wing it's not like he's done it on the edge of the area or in the middle of the pitch which is where you normally get red cards for denying an obvious goal scoring opportunity.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2014 10:58 pm 
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Nine points from 12 games have made for VfB Stuttgart’s worst start in 40 years but the gracious manner in which Armin Veh has accepted responsibility for the failure is probably unprecedented in the history of the Bundesliga.

The 53-year-old manager resigned late on Sunday after the 1-0 home defeat against Augsburg – courtesy of an early dismissal for Daniel Schwaab and a slightly dubious penalty – and explained to reporters on Monday morning that he was experiencing “one of those spells when things don’t go your way. That’s shit, so it’s better if I’m no longer around.”

Of course, it wasn’t only a “lack of luck,” as Veh gamely argued, that has plunged the Swabians to the bottom of the table. Stuttgart have been woeful in all areas and the much more coherent performances by smaller, less financially powerful, teams – Augsburg, Mainz, Paderborn, Freiburg – have only brought their own shortcomings into even sharper relief.

Veh explicitly denied suffering fatigue in the job – “not the case” – but he did seem tired of suffering unfortunate outcomes week in, week out, without any clear idea about a remedy. “Sometimes you fight and fight but can’t change it,” he said. “I’m listening to my gut,” Veh added, a little bit teary-eyed.

Owning up to managerial impotence is not the done thing in professional football. It’s much easier to wait for the axe to fall, to blame the players and to pocket the compensation for your dismissal. Veh, however, obviously felt too loyal to the club where he had won the championship in 2007 and which effectively kick-started his career at this level. His resignation saved Stuttgart lots of money. “He’s a gentleman,” said the VfB president, Bernd Wahler.

Wahler has veered from crisis to crisis in his 15 months in charge at the Mercedes-Benz Arena. Picking Veh, a coach who was very good at riding a wave of success but has often proved completely unable to solve problems, was a grave mistake – he has obviously underestimated just how poor the team have become in relation to their rivals.

The assistant coaches Reiner Geyer and Armin Reutershahn will prepare the team for Friday’s game at Freiburg unless a successor can be installed before then. Wahler seemed unsure about the type of coach needed in these desperate circumstances. He said they were looking for an experienced operator but also for somebody who could develop the playing style further. Curiously, Berti Vogts has been mooted as the prime candidate. That just goes to show how big the Swabians’ predicament is. They had already fired the sporting director, Fredi Bobic, earlier in the campaign and now have to recruit somebody who would be willing to take over at a pretty big club with no real team and no firm expectation to avoid the drop.

Now that Hamburg look a little less dysfunctional under Joe Zinnbauer, Stuttgart might well become the most-prominent casualties of the overall improvement in coaching and scouting in the league. Smaller clubs have successfully breached the traditional gap, with sheer ingenuity and hard work, and the traditional powerhouses’ sense of entitlement will not insulate them from the storm of anarchy in the table. Stuttgart must hope that Veh’s heartfelt farewell will not turn out to be their one moment of genuine class in the entire season.

From one manager who has ruefully admitted that his time at a club has run its course to … Jürgen Klopp. The Borussia Dortmund manager openly declared his willingness to coach in England’s Premier League – “its the only country for me, next to Germany” – in a BT Sport interview but excitement levels about the said bombshell in Germany are yet to match those in England, where “Kloppo” will reportedly take on José Mourinho’s Chelsea with a minimum of four different teams at his disposal next year. Most local observers simply do not believe he is quite ready to leave his position at Dortmund, a role he called “the best of my life” in the same interview.

The club and supporters at the Signal Iduna Park certainly remain firmly behind him, another setback in the shape of a 2-2 draw with little neighbours SC Paderborn notwithstanding. Dortmund are 16th in the table, still nine points adrift of fourth place, and they will be without Marco Reus until the new year as well. The Germany international ruptured his ankle ligament in, to use Klopp’s words, an “uncontrolled tackle” by Marvin Bakalorz. “It was a horrific moment, I find it hard to talk about football now,” said the manager after the disappointing result.

Dortmund had led 2-0 at half-time, thanks to goals from Reus and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, but struggled in the second 45 minutes. A wrongly chalked-off goal from Kevin Grosskreutz compounded the misery. “We cannot afford to switch into administrative mode,” warned the CEO, Hans-Joachim Watzke before switching into Churchillian mode himself. “Blood, sweat and tears,” were needed to turn around their campaign, he added.

First, though, a relatively pressure-free trip to the Emirates. The Champions League has provided respite from domestic chores – and Klopp will undoubtedly enjoy playing to the gallery this week.

Results Bayern 4-0 Hoffenheim, Hannover 1-3 Leverkusen, Mainz 2-2 Freiburg, Paderborn 2-2 BVB, Gladbach 1-3 Frankfurt, Schalke 3-2 Wolfsburg, Köln 1-2 Hertha, Hamburg 2-0 Bremen, Stuttgart 0-1 Augsburg.


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2015 5:37 pm 
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Andre Schurrle has revealed he wanted to stay at Chelsea but is looking forward to playing first-team football consistently at Wolfsburg.

The Germany international signed for a club-record fee of £24.6million on deadline day after struggling to make an impact this season under Jose Mourinho.

Schurrle said he was originally not looking to leave Chelsea but started considering an exit toward the end of the transfer window due to a lack of first-team football

He said: "I wanted to stay but the last weeks or last month I tended towards changing something because I wanted to do what is fun for me and that is to play football. I could only do it briefly at Chelsea in the past weeks.”


Despite helping Germany win the World Cup last year, Schurrle struggled for form and fitness with Mourinho opting to play Oscar, Eden Hazard and Willian just behind central striker Diego Costa.

The attacking midfielder still managed to score 14 goals in a Chelsea shirt and he has no regrets about moving there from Bayer Leverkusen for £18m in 2013.

“I think I had a good time with Chelsea,” he said.

“My first season was very good, then there was the World Cup. I was a starter at the beginning of the season until an illness moved me behind. But the team continued to win so yes… I am still confident and know what I can do.

"I am not here in Wolfsburg to sneak over the pitch seeking my form. I am highly motivated and will try everything I can to help the team immediately.”

Schurrle's exit from Stamford Bridge paved the way for Fiorentina winger Juan Cuadrado to join Chelsea and both deals couldn’t be completed until the final day of the transfer window.

“The last days were very stressful to me,” he said.

“I was on the mobile phone all the time, waiting and hoping for a call or a message saying it’s a done deal. And that I can return to Germany and go to Wolfsburg.

"Although the whole process took some time, I was sure that someday it would be successful in the end. Now I am sitting here and I am happy to be part of this team.”


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 Post subject: Re: Bundesliga Thread
PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2015 5:48 pm 
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Kevin de Bruyne reckons he failed to make an impact at Chelsea because of his "small transfer fee".

The midfielder joined the Blues from Genk in January 2012 for around £7m but spent most of his time away from Stamford Bridge.

He was loaned back to the Belgian club before being sent out for a further spell with Werder Bremen, and was then finally sold in early 2014 to Bundesliga side Wolfsburg for a sum in the region of £16m.

"Maybe things would have been different if Chelsea had to pay €45m (£32m) and not €8m (£6.7m) when I arrived from Racing Genk," De Bruyne told Sport-BILD weekly.

"A higher transfer fee would have potentially handed me a different sort of status inside the club. And possibly, handed me more chances (to play more regularly)."

The 23-year-old, who played just three times, says he felt sidelined in west London.

"Chelsea FC has not been the best choice at that point in time," he added.

"Being with Chelsea is like being in a different world. Manager Jose Mourinho did not explain to me why I was not playing more regularly for the club."

Wolfsburg are second in the Bundesliga – just eight points behind Bayern Munich – but while De Bruyne admits he feels far happier in Germany, he remains set on a second chance with a high-profile club.

"I feel very much at home with VfL Wolfsburg in this very moment," he added.

"Life in football can be fast-moving. Wolfsburg is not yet like Bayern Munich, of course and my biggest ambition is to play for a big European club – one I can win trophies with."


He's probably got a point but at least he got out quickly and his career has blossomed as a result.

As for his quotes roughly translated that is

Dear Mr Guardiola,

Are you looking for a new winger in the summer? I happen to be very interested in joining your organisation and would like to arrange a meeting with you to discuss what I could potentially offer you.

Regards,
Kevin De Bruyne

The reports in Germany seem to be that Bayern are very interested in him as a potetial long term replacement to Robben/Ribery who are now both in their 30's and it would fit with there usual policy of strengthening their squad by also weakening their rivals so with Reus off the table for now De Bruyne is probably the next man in line.


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