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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Thu Dec 03, 2015 1:35 pm 
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General of the Army
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fire extinguishers wrote:
Hm :hmm:
As it is REAL they will find a way . A fine maybe .


Normally I'd say it's nailed on you get kicked out but I think they'll look to play a replay and fine Madrid.

The fact a teams already been booted out for doing the same thing makes it a done deal for me.

I guess the way they do suspensions doesn't help in England bookings/red cards in cups just mean you miss league fixtures in Spain it's different you get sent off or booked in the cup you are only banned in the cup when you have players on loan this must be a bit of a nightmare for the admin people. I'm assuming this was Madrid's first cup match this season otherwise surely he'd already have served his 1 game ban in the previous rounds


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2015 4:49 pm 
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Disqualified from the CDR...couldnt have happened to a nicer club :thumbup:

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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2015 5:30 pm 
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Bright side for Benitez at least it's one less competition they can lose to Barca in.

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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:07 pm 
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Rafa Benitez looks set to be dismissed as Real Madrid manager later on Monday, according to Sky Sports' Spanish football expert Guillem Balague


Was a weird appointment to be honest.


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:39 pm 
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no clue why he is being sacked...27 goals in the last 6 games, 4 of points off the top.. :ohmy: :|

18 games, 11 wins, 4 draws, 3 defeats

what am i missing ?

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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:57 pm 
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Just because it's Rafa.... :lol:

Don't think the players like him too much do they? not sure the style fits either.

Heck I don't know, probably just that they can get Mourinho.


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 5:01 pm 
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The fans don't like him they never wanted him & the players don't seem to like him.

The fans have a problem with the president when the heat comes on the president his normal move is to sack the manager.

Didn't they score 10 in one league match and 7 or 8 vs Malmo who were the whipping boys of their group.

The issue for Madrid fans is in the big games they've looked poor and imo it's because the squad has been badly put together there is no proper holding midfield player with some physical presence which allows the defence to be attacked and up front Ronaldo is not being consistent with his scoring he's scoring 3 or 4 in one game then going 2 or 3 without a goal.

Jose coming back maybe?


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 5:26 pm 
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rumour is it is Zidane at the moment


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 5:41 pm 
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Mr Carrot wrote:
rumour is it is Zidane at the moment


Yeah I saw that Zidane with Solari as his number 2


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 8:10 pm 
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Real Madrid sack Rafael Benitez after just seven months in charge

Rafael Benitez has been sacked as manager of Real Madrid after just seven months in charge at the Bernabeu.
The 55-year-old Spaniard was relieved of his duties following a meeting of the club's board on Monday.
Real's B team coach Zinedine Zidane, 43, has replaced him.
Former Real Madrid, Atletico Madrid and Inter Milan winger Santiago Solari, 39, has been appointed as Zidane's assistant manager.


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 3:02 pm 
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Saw a graphic on Sky Sports News yesterday that showed his points per game record was worse than every manager they've had in the last 10 years apart from Capello.

Benitez I think had an average of 2.08 points per game. That is how high the bar is set considering every manager who was above him was also sacked by Real Madrid I think Mourinho was top with something like 2.68 points per game which is crazy.


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 4:43 pm 
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Was never meant to be a Real manager .. funny thing is they tried Guardiola before deciding on Zidane ..

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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 10:13 pm 
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There was a moment at the end of Zinedine Zidane’s presentation as the manager of Real Madrid when he was asked what he would settle for between now and the end of the season. Aged 43, he is after all embarking on his first top-flight managerial job, for which his only experience is 18 months with the kids in the Madrid B team, down in Spain’s 80-team, regionalised third tier,and he arrives mid-way through the season, inheriting a team in third place, having been hammered 4-0 in the clásico, and have been whistled by their own fans during every home game for six weeks.

“Winning everything,” he replied.

Little else will do, Zidane knows. “Wouldn’t it have been better to have arrived at the start of a season?” he was asked. “Yes, but six months have passed and I’m here now.” “Is the Champions League really an objective?” he was asked. “Yes. When you play with this shirt, everything is real: winning is fundamental at this club and the Champions League is the objective and it always will be.” “Are you really ready?” he was asked. “No manager is ever ready, still less someone who has never coached before. But I’m ready. I want this. I have ilusión.”

Alongside “work”, ilusión was the word he repeated most often: hope, enthusiasm, a dream. It may yet prove just another illusion at a club where many problems are not so much managerial as structural; ilusión may just be the normal first day feeling, briefly experienced by all the rest and quickly lost. There have been 21 coaches in the last 20 years, 11 in a decade under Florentino Pérez alone. Yet none have been quite like Zidane, perhaps not even José Mourinho. There was ilusión , all right.

Forgotten already, barely mentioned, it was as if Rafa Benítez had never been there at all. On Monday, no questions had been allowed and no explanation was offered for a sacking that Benítez’s camp claimed had not even been communicated. On Tuesday, the club’s institutional director Emilio Butragueño, facing the media where the president Pérez would not, gestured at Zidane. “The answer is here,” he said, evading an answer. “All I can say is that we’re delighted he’s the new coach and we trust in him. A new chapter has opened, with a lot of ilusión.”

Zidane’s lack of experience didn’t matter. Despite the fact his results for the B team have been mixed and the president had his own reservations, many have drawn parallels to Pep Guardiola at Barcelona. “Don’t,” Zidane responded. “Guardiola is Guardiola. Guardiola is a formidable coach. What he is doing is incredible but I am not going to compare us: I never did it as a player and I am never going to do it as a coach. What matters is the day-to-day work, what I can show to the squad.”

The status is similar though and after five years spent playing for Madrid, volleyed winner in the European Cup final included, Zidane’s eminence matters. It may be his strongest card. For now, at least.

“You are a legend,” one question began. “Will that mean the president treats you better?” “No: not at all, the role of the coach is to get results and what matters is that we win matches,” Zidane said but he knows his position is stronger than that of his predecessor, even if he is even more aware than might be imagined that presidential prerogative will remain: he has experienced that already with Castilla, Madrid’s reserve team, where Martin Odegaard’s protegee status has proven occasionally problematic.

When it came to the players, Zidane conceded his playing past could help, not least as he knows most of them. He played with the captain Sergio Ramos in his final season a decade ago, and he was assistant to Carlo Ancelotti when Madrid won the European Cup in 2014. Carrying out individualised drills, he was close to some of them. He is certainly seen more as one of them than Benítez was. “It’s an important point. I know the dressing room; I was with them with Ancelotti,” he said. “But then it’s the work [that matters],” he said.

Some of Madrid’s players had a nickname for Benítez that mocked him for the way he tried to tell them what to do and how to kick a ball despite the fact he had never played professionally: the No10, they called him. Now they have a real No10, even if he did wear No5 when he played here, and Zidane admittedthe “most important thing” was to have a good relationship with the players. They are the ones who must perform; they are also a source of power.

“For sure the treatment will be different [to Castilla]: they are experienced players, Real Madrid players,” he said. “But the message I will have for players will be the same: that’s going to be based on work. You have to be close to the players, to have a good relationship with all of them. I am responsible for the team and I want everything to go well so I want a good relationship with everyone.”

That includes Gareth Bale, one of the few Madrid players upset at the departure of Benítez. “I understand that he can been annoyed because he was an important coach for him but he is going to have the same affection [from me] as with Rafa,” Zidane said. “He is important for the squad, fundamental for the team. He is phenomenal and what he has been doing recently is fantastic. I’m going to give him all my affection and support so that he plays well.” Affection is one thing; Bale’s position is another. He does not want to be returned to the wing.

That remains to be seen. What Bale does know already is that he will play with Cristiano Ronaldo and Karim Benzema. Asked about James Rodríguez, Zidane took the opportunity to insist that “all players will be important”, that he would count on the “entire squad”. So far, so standard. When he was asked whether Bale, Benzema and Cristiano – “the BBC” – would remain his forward line, the answer was more unequivocal. “Yes,” he said. “Yes they will play. That is my idea. Clearly.”

Those most excited by Zidane’s arrival are the fans, of course, and that is the point at a club partly driven by populism. With Benítez in trouble, one newspaper poll already had over 70% of supporters backing him to come in. In the morning, he took his first training session with the team at the Alfredo Di Stéfano stadium constructed at the club’s Valdebebas HQ. It was Madrid’s annual open session, children invited for free on Spain’s equivalent of Christmas Eve: Reyes, when the three kings are said to have reached Bethlehem bearing gifts. Zidane was theirs.

The timing was probably not coincidental. Benítez may have been booed; Zidane was applauded by 5,000, the arena almost full. He waved and they chanted his name. Before that he had gone round the dressing room and shaken the players’ hands one by one. “My first words were simple ones,” he said. “I said I was happy to be at their side and that we were beginning a new adventure and that we would do all we could to reach our objectives.”

How, though? While some saw Zidane the player as elegant and effortless, he always preferred to see himself as a competitor. But style does matter. “It has always been important to see nice football and that’s the path I will follow,” he said. “Attacking, balanced football. Playing from the back, getting into the other half of the pitch quickly, keeping possession of the ball. I will try to give our football my personal touch, an attacking touch. I want the players to enjoy it on the pitch.”

So, he was asked, who is your role model, the coach who you will try to emulate? He has learnt from the best, after all. He was sporting director when José Mourinho was coach, assistant when Ancelotti was in charge, and he travelled to watch Guardiola work at Bayern while he completed his licence and prepared himself for this moment.

“I knew them well and I had a lot of other coaches as a player too,” Zidane said. “And I have taken important things from all of them. Now, what I have to do is to be the coach that I want to be. Everyone says that to me: ‘Do what you think is right for your players and your team.’ You can’t do the same as another coach did. I have to be Zidane.”


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2016 8:59 pm 
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After seeing some actions from Ramos Pepe and Isco this season there is hope Zidane will teach them to use their head more .

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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 6:50 pm 
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spent four years telling him he was a good header of the ball and every time he replied: ‘No, I’m not,’” says Pierrot Labat, a celebrated and long-serving coach at Bordeaux where, over two decades ago, he nurtured a young Zinedine Zidane. “On his first appearance for France, which was here in Bordeaux, he scored with a header and when he scored another two in the World Cup final I was in the stands again, crying my eyes out. You see, with him my work was always more psychological than technical because, like many exceptionally gifted people, he doubts a lot. He needs to prove things to himself. But when he talked for the first time about his ambitions to become a manager, back in 2012, I told him straight away that he had the qualities to be a very successful one. I think he is going to become the Alex Ferguson of Real Madrid.”

Time will tell on that one. But, to tweak Laozi, a reign of 1,500 matches starts with a single game and the journey of Zidane the first-team gaffer begins on Saturday when Real Madrid host Deportivo la Coruña. It has taken a while for Zidane to make this first step, partially because he doubted a lot.

As a player Zidane often said that a future in the dugout held little appeal. It was not until six years after his retirement that he declared that he would pursue a career in management. He was 40. By that age Michel Platini, the only French player of comparable status to Zidane and who went into management straight after retiring, had backed out of it, quitting as national team boss at 37 after failure at Euro 92 and shifting instead into the sport’s nebulous administrative and political sector, which he seemed to find more comfortable. Until recently.

It seemed that Zidane did not commit to management until he grew bored, not least of a shallow ambassadorial role at Real Madrid. Those who know him well believe he just needed time to prove to himself that, as Labat puts it, “he really wanted to learn how to help others to express his vision of the game”. Those people reckon he will be a manager of conviction, that he is in it for the long haul.

“You can only succeed as a manager if you really want to do it and I know from being with him over the last couple of years that he really does, and he has done his utmost to achieve it,” says Guy Lacombe, who was manager at AS Cannes when Zidane was a teenage trainee there and is an instructor at the French Football Federation’s Direction Technique Nationale, a position that led to him renewing acquaintances with Zidane two years ago, this time as a tutor helping the former player to become a fully qualified coach.

“It’s funny how life brought us back together after so many years,” says Lacombe, who has also managed Paris Saint-Germain and Monaco. “I found that he has the same qualities now that he had when I first met him. Above all, he is a simple person despite the immense aura that he now has in the football world. He is reserved and only speaks when he has something to say. But he is very attentive and really listens to people.

“As his tutor I saw a lot of him and went to Madrid three or four times to observe his sessions with the Castilla [Real’s B team, which Zidane ran for a year and a half before replacing Rafael Benítez at the head of the senior team this week]. He has really taken on the mantle of manager. We discussed technical things but I only gave him one piece of advice, which is the same I give to all managers: stay true to yourself and follow your instinct. Being a manager is about making decisions, so listen to that voice inside you and let it take the decisions. I don’t have any worries on that front for Zinedine.”

What, then, are Zidane’s instincts as a manager? During his studies, which culminated in him earning his Uefa Pro Licence last May, he watched Pep Guardiola’s sessions at Bayern Munich but did most of his course work in France, showing particular interest in the methods of the then Marseille manager, Marcelo Bielsa, and, most of all, Christian Gourcuff, now manager of Algeria but who is acclaimed mainly for his work during 11 years at Lorient where he created slick, attacking sides on a shoestring budget. Zidane appreciates that style, though financial constraints are not something he cares to replicate which is why he rejected an offer in 2014 to begin his managerial career back at Bordeaux. Money should not be a problem at Real and his preferred style, if he can produce it, will be just what the Santiago Bernabéu crowd have been ordering.

But will he produce it? That will require forming a balanced team and taming oversized egos. Because of his imagination as a player Zidane has been hailed as the antidote to the caution of Benítez but he is unlikely to prescribe a populist, all-guns-blazing approach. As a player he stressed that he was only able to perform his magic because of the stage-building craft of Claude Makélélé, whose sale by Madrid to Chelsea he decried as the blunder that brought about the demise of the first galácticos era, memorably quipping that flogging Makelele and then buying David Beckham was tantamount to putting “another layer of gold paint on the Bentley when you are losing the entire engine”. Zidane probably noted more recently that Bielsa’s reign at Marseille unravelled when the Argentinian became overwhelmed by attack-lust and spurned defensive midfielders.

Fitting all Real’s forwards into the lineup could be self-destructive, yet leaving any of them out risks polluting the atmosphere and, of course, flouting the policy of the president, Florentino Pérez. Zidane confirmed at his opening press conference that he would start Cristiano Ronaldo, Karim Benzema and Gareth Bale, but was vaguer about James Rodríguez and Isco and, indeed, did not specify the positions the other three will play. Will Bale retain the central role he enjoyed under Benítez? If Zidane believes the Welshman is more use on the wing, will Bale conclude that he is better off at another club?

Zidane is going to have to come across as a convincing negotiator in the dressing room. At least he will benefit from more legitimacy than Benítez did. Some players with very definite notions of how they should play were scornful of his right to issue instructions to the contrary, nicknaming him The No10 as a sarcastic snipe at his own insignificant playing career. No one can belittle Zidane. He really is The No10.

One Castilla player spoke of Zidane’s magnetism and if his golden reputation does not carry enough weight in talks, then Zidane believes he has the nous to cajole or coerce players into doing what he requires, telling L’Equipe: “You have to manipulate players a bit … carrot and stick.”

Lacombe says: “Over the years he, like all players, formed opinions of the personalities and exercises of various managers he worked under but when you are a player your opinion only relates to your own game, you do not have to have an overall picture like a manager does. Over the last two or three years that is all Zinedine has been thinking about: the team. Even though as a player he had all the qualities needed to bring the best out of others around him on the pitch, he still had to reflect on how he could do that from the sidelines. He has developed those qualities and can convey them now as a manager.”

Zidane demonstrated at Castilla that he is strong enough to insist on team cohesion taking priority over individuals. He often left out Martin Odegaard, the Norwegian teenager signed last year amid much fanfare and on a far bigger salary than anyone else at Real’s B team. Odegaard trained with the first team and was expected to play for Castilla when made available, causing resentment among some players and leading Zidane to conclude the team would be best served by the side that had trained together all week. Odegaard was not pleased, nor was Pérez. Real’s president began to wonder, especially as Castilla’s performances were unconvincing for much of last season, whether he could rely on Zidane to serve his purposes at all.

Muttering was even heard in the summer about Pérez preparing to ditch Zidane before deciding to keep him if only because, in the eyes of supporters, the Frenchman still emitted a stellar glow that reflected well on Pérez. According to that theory, Pérez would retain Zidane in a prominent but relatively innocuous position and certainly did not intend enthroning him as first-team king. But Benítez’s unpopularity became such that Pérez felt compelled to make a change this week and standing in Zidane’s way at that point would have risked enflaming anger at the president rather than countering it so Zidane may have emerged as even more powerful than his employer while Pérez may have manoeuvred himself into a precarious position. Perhaps Zidane is a skilled politician on top of everything else.

Zidane is aware that the intrigue, the expectations and more media demands than even he has ever faced before mean he will have to keep cool and surround himself with allies whose loyalty is beyond doubt. His No2 was always going to be David Bettoni, who has been his friend since the pair were trainees at Cannes and is godfather to one of his children. Bettoni’s playing career did not amount to much but it did revolve around his illustrious friend’s, as after Zidane moved to Juventus in 1996, Bettoni left Cannes and spent the next five years at four different lower league clubs, all close to Turin. He later moved into coaching and was running Cannes’ Under-19 team when Zidane brought him to Castilla last year.

“They really complement each other,” says the Cannes president, Pierre Cancian. “David is really demanding and meticulous, very aware that little details make big differences. He encourages a style of football a lot like that of Arsène Wenger, another great coach who started out at Cannes.”

Bettoni, as part of his coaching education, completed a course in Switzerland in 2010 entitled Mastering Your Emotions. His support could help Zidane do just that.

“I always told Zizou that without the people around him, especially his wife, Véronique, he would not have achieved all the feats that he has,” says Labat. “That support is crucial for him. I remember talking to Bixente Lizarazu about the headbutt at the 2006 World Cup and Liza said that if he had spoken to Zizou before the final, as he had done before the [last-16] match against Spain, he could have helped remove the tension that caused it. Zizou puts so much pressure on himself to do his maximum that he needs a circuit breaker to ensure there is no explosion and that is what the people close to him do for him.”

On Saturday, at least, more than 81,000 adoring fans will be close to him when he sends a senior team out for the first time as manager. The demands at Real are unique but is there really anywhere better for Zidane to start? “Some say Zidane would have been wiser to start his managerial career at a small club but I lean towards the view that Real is the best possible place for him to begin,” says Lacombe. “To be a good manager you have first of all to be in the right place at the right time and Madrid is undoubtedly the right place for him.

“Everyone was awaiting his appointment but all the pressure is on the president who appointed him. He knows the players very well from having worked with them in competitive situations while assistant to Carlo Ancelotti and by being always around the dressing room. That is an incredible advantage. Normally when you arrive as a manager in a club you know maybe two or three players, but not the whole squad. To have such a deep knowledge of his environment puts him in a great starting position. So the only question that remains is: ‘Is this the right time?’ I wholeheartedly hope so.”


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2016 7:03 pm 
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Former Real Madrid defender Roberto Carlos believes he could be key in taking Barcelona's Neymar to the Santiago Bernabeu.

The 42-year-old former Brazil international confirmed he was currently involved in talks to join new Real manager Zinedine Zidane's backroom staff at the Bernabeu.

The World Cup winner, who made over 500 appearances across an 11-year spell with the Madrid club, is confident he could persuade compatriot Neymar, who came third at Monday night's Ballon d'Or ceremony, to join Real from rivals Barca.

"I had a meeting with Real Madrid about my future with the club," he said in an interview on Punto Pelota.

"Soon I will know how I can collaborate with Zidane's Madrid."

Regarding Barca striker Neymar, he added: "I can take him to Real Madrid. He's very young. I am sure next year he will finish even higher in the Ballon d'Or."

Zidane replaced Rafael Benitez at the helm eight days ago and led Real to a 5-0 La Liga victory on his debut at home to Deportivo on Saturday.

Gareth Bale scored a hat-trick in that win and Roberto Carlos believes Zidane can help turn the Wales star into a leading candidate for the FIFA award, which was won for a fifth time by Argentina's Lionel Messi on Monday.

"Zidane is a leader in the dressing room," he added. "His personality is going to make him very successful. A coach has to befriend his players and Benitez struggled to form a bond with them.

"Zidane can do whatever he wants with him [Bale] and maybe even turn him into a candidate for the Ballon d'Or."

Real are through to the last 16 of the Champions League where they will face Roma but were thrown out of the Copa del Rey for fielding an ineligible player - suspended winger Denis Cheryshev - in the 3-1 fourth round victory at Cadiz, with an appeal having been rejected.

Zidane's men, third in the table, are next in action when they take on Sporting Gijon at home on Sunday.


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2016 5:17 pm 
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Real Madrid are set to announce football’s first £1bn kit deal, according to reports in Spain on Friday.

With the headline “The most expensive shirt in the world”, Spanish newspaper Marca says Adidas, who signed a deal with Manchester United in 2014 worth a record £750m over 10 years, are expected to confirm they have signed a new partnership with Real.

The contract, which is believed to be worth £106m a season, would be worth more than Chelsea, Arsenal and Liverpool’s combined and would see Real regain their position at the top of the most lucrative kit agreements after losing that position to United.

The club only signed a new deal with Adidas in 2012 which was due to run until 2020 but are said to have been negotiating with the German manufacturer for the last few months.


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2016 12:15 pm 
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Well they are going to eclipsed united with those mega stars they have .. Real is a huge huge club ...

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So true mate ...he is consistently inconsistent throughout his united career ..but what if he turns consistent ..he will get around 40 goals...ATM im waiting for that time as his age is 24/25 :wait: ... :|
on Rooney ,Jan 16th, ..and as they rest is history


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2016 3:34 pm 
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The biggest advantage Real have is every penny they make is spent on the club they don't have shareholders who take money out its the same at Barca like it or not Utd is a money making business first football club second


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 Post subject: Re: The general Real Madrid thread
PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 2:46 pm 
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Posts: 3436
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Quote:
News outlet Sport have reported that Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos have handed in their transfer requests at Real Madrid, delivering the news in person to Real president Florentino Perez.

Both players have been strongly linked with a move to Manchester United in recent seasons.

The original story, that Ronaldo and Ramos had gone to meet Perez and tell him they wanted to leave, was first brought to light on Spanish TV programme El Chiringuito last night.

The incident reportedly happened after Real's1-0 defeat by neighbours Atletico Madrid last weekend. Real are now 12 points behind leaders Barcelona in third place in La Liga.


Something's not right over there. Shame.


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